FOLLOW US
We're Everywhere!
77° 25° C
What in the Turks and Caicos are you looking for?
Type your search terms and pause for instant results.
Point Grace Resort, Grace Bay Beach, Providenciales.

Beaches of Providenciales

The pristine Grace Bay Beach, Providenciales.

Scroll down for pages on every beach on Providenciales.

There are so many exquisite beaches throughout the Turks and Caicos, but of all the islands in the country, Providenciales definitely has the edge in overall quality and quantity.

Due to consisting of broken down shells and coral, the sand in the Turks and Caicos is a measure above what’s found at the beaches in most other countries. Sediments, clay, soils and gravel are practically non-existent on the beaches here, which makes for especially clean and soft powdery white sand.

Beautiful beaches can be found on all sides of Providenciales, however, the coastlines on the west half of the island are a bit more difficult to access than the popular Grace Bay Beach, The Bight Beach and Leeward Beach.

Beach styles across Providenciales also vary quite a bit. The Grace Bay and Leeward beaches on the northeast of Providenciales tend to be wide with deeper clean sandy ocean floors.

The central north coast beaches in the Bight and Turtle Cove areas have lush sea grass not far from shore and offer several great snorkelling sites, such as the The Bight Reef and Smith's Reef.

The beaches of Long Bay Beach, Five Cays Beach, Sapodilla Bay and Taylor Bay on the south Caicos Banks side of the island have shallow water and fine sand grains.

Sailboats at the Bight Beach, Providenciales.

The greatest variance is found on the north and northwest edge of the island. Low cliffs, rugged rocky sections and sheltered wetlands are found along the miles of uninhabited coast.

Hotels and resorts are generally found on Grace Bay, and luxury vacation rental villas front many of the smaller beaches on the island.

All Beaches in the Turks and Caicos are Public

All beaches in the Turks and Caicos are public and free-to-access up to the high tide point (generally where the vegetation begins). This doesn’t guarantee access across private land to get to the beach, but if someone tries to chase you off by stating that a beach is “private”, they’re misinformed.

What’s the Best Beach on Providenciales?

Grace Bay is the island's top coast. Simply, it’s consistently excellent and the coast is extensive.

Leeward Beach and the Bight Beach are absolutely spectacular beaches, and although a little smaller, they also very a bit more and see less traffic.

Half Moon Bay, Little Water Cay. Many of the uninhabited islands near Providenciales are home to unbelievable beaches and can be visited on a boat cruise.

Taylor Bay and Sapodilla Bay near Chalk Sound feature shallow, warm water and calm conditions, hence making them a perfect choice for a family with small children.

Snorkelling

Of the coasts that are easily accessible, Smith’s Reef offers the best snorkelling. However, the area consists of quite a few reef systems, and the reefs close to shore don’t quite match the deeper sites.

The Bight Reef is one system, centrally located and easy to find in the water, so we advise beginners and newcomers to start at this site.

The remote Northwest Point Marine National Park coastline and Malcolm’s Road Beach hide the top shore snorkelling sites around Providenciales, however, they are both difficult to locate and travel to.

Our Smaller Cays

One of our most popular activities is an island hopping boat cruise. These tours typically visit the small undeveloped cays around Providenciales.

These destinations include Little Water Cay with its resident Turks and Caicos Rock Iguanas, the beautiful beach and lagoon of Half Moon Bay, and Water Cay, Pine Cay and Fort George Cay.

Key Points

  • Some boat operators are extremely reckless which has resulted in tourists being killed. You should be extremely careful of boat traffic in your area and watch your children. This is especially common with banana boat and other wake ride operators, some of which are unlicenced and uninsured. Being hit by a boat will most likely kill you.
  • All accesses to the beach are free.
  • All beaches are public, including beaches in front of resorts and private residences. The government has allowed some private individuals to shut down beach accesses, but the beaches are still public (just difficult to access).
  • Fishing without a licence or in National Parks is illegal and carries significant fines and possible jail time (especially for foreigners). This includes collecting conch and lobster.
  • Secluded beaches carry an increased risk of crime, both to person and property. Don't leave valuables in your car or on the beach unattended. Read our Safety and Crime section for more information.
  • Some beaches are very remote and there may not be any other people around to provide assistance in an emergency. Exercise caution and be aware of currents, surf conditions and hidden hazards.
Grace Bay Beach
The hallmark of the Turks and Caicos, the top-rated Grace Bay Beach is second to none. Tourist information on beach accesses, parking, snorkelling and more.
Leeward Beach
Found on the northeast coast, the spectacular Leeward Beach tends to be far less crowded than Grace Bay. A few low rocky patches interrupt the otherwise pristine white sand coast in a couple places, but you’ll get seclusion in exchange. The eastern-most access is a great kayak and paddle board launch spot to visit the wildlife sanctuary islands of Little Water Cay and Mangrove Cay.
The Bight Beach
Adjacent to the west of end Grace Bay, the Bight Beach offers calm water and white sand. Unlike Grace Bay, lush sea grass can be found growing not too far off the beach and several snorkelling reefs can be found in the area. The main Children’s Park beach access affords plenty of parking and sheltered picnic tables.
The Bight Reef
This easy to access reef is the most popular snorkelling spot on Providenciales. Floats and guide ropes make navigation out on the water simple and the colourful reef fish here tend to be a bit tamer than at other sites. The Bight Reef is an excellent first stop spot for new snorkelers.
Smith's Reef
This collection of reefs is located between the Bight and Turtle Cove. The best location on Providenciales for snorkelling from the shore, it’s common to see large amounts of fish, barracudas, lobsters, rays and turtles. Be sure to consult the snorkelling map as some of the coral heads can be difficult to find.
Taylor Bay
A beautiful and sheltered cove on the south coast of Providenciales, the water here tends to be very shallow and quite calm. Water temperatures here are also typically a little bit warmer than at the north coast beaches, so this is a great beach for children. Taylor Bay Beach is also fascinating at low tide, as the sandy seabed is usually exposed in interesting patterns.
Sapodilla Bay
The scenic and sheltered Sapodilla Bay Beach is found near Chalk Sound on Providenciales. Like Taylor Bay, the water here is shallow, calm and typically a little warmer than at the other beaches. One of the smaller beaches on the island, Taylor Bay can get a bit crowded.
Babalua Beach
Although centrally located, this secluded beach is a little difficult to find and consequently sees very few visitors. Some snorkelling can be found a distance of the beach, but it isn’t up to what can be seen at the nearby Smith’s Reef. Likewise, the water and beach are decent, but they are surpassed by many of the other beaches on Providenciales.
Long Bay Beach
One of the finest kiteboarding locations in the Caribbean, Long Bay Beach offers shallow turquoise water and a clean sandy bottom. On non-windy days, this is a quiet and beautiful place to visit, but when the breeze is up it can get quite hectic on the water!
Five Cays Beach
Fronting one of the three original settlements on Providenciales, the expansive bay here supports a long beach with shallow water. Abandoned dead conch shells and the occasional piece of junk equipment detract from what would otherwise be a decent beach.
Cooper Jack Bay Beach
Located off the central south coast of Providenciales, Cooper Jack Bay offers a small beach at the bottom of limestone sea cliffs. The size of this beach does vary and can completely disappear during a high spring tide, but when exposed is decent. The cliffs above hide many small caves and sinkholes in the dense vegetation. Unfortunately, large amounts of litter mar this area.
Blue Hills Beach
Found off of the old Blue Hills settlement, walking along the beach can provide a look into what life might have been like on the island before the modern development. Nearly the entire distance of the ocean here has shallow water with seaweed and broken coral, so swimming and snorkeling conditons are poor.
Turtle Tail Beach
Located in a residential area with a few vacation villas, a few small beaches can be found here among the rocky bluffs. The water here is very shallow out to several small islands but beware as old conch shells can be hidden in the water. Unfortunately, there are no clear access to these beaches.
Northwest Point National Park
The remote and rugged limestone coastline of Northwest Point offers countless small coves and cliffs to explore. A great place to spend an afternoon, the interior ponds here are some of the best birdwatching spots on Providenciales. An especially impressive spot when the ocean swell is high.
Malcolm's Road Beach
Beautiful and remote, this beach offers much to explore. Due to being close to the edge of the Caicos Islands plateau and the deeper water, this beach sometimes experiences breaking surf off the beach and has a bit more of a rugged appearance than the other Providenciales beaches. For the adventurous, great snorkeling can be found at many spots here.
Thompson Cove Beach
A small beach at the inlet canal to Thompson's Cove, the water here tend to have quite a bit of rocks, seaweed and sea urchins. Due to accesses being blocked off, it’s now necessary to walk up from Blue Hills Beach to visit.
West Harbour Bluff
West Harbor Bluff is the southwest point of Providenciales. Several interesting features are found at this picturesque coastline including cliffs, a small cave, 200 year-old rock carvings and a mile of secluded beach to explore. Directly to the north of this bay is the Frenchman’s Creek Nature Reserve.